Category Archives: Yoga Philosophy

Human crisis and Covid-19. How can Yoga Philosophy help.

By Alba Rodriguez Juan, M.A. Current times are challenging for most of us. The widespread of Covid-19 around the globe has put humanity on trial. It has taken us to the present moment, here and now. This can be scary, especially for those who find hard to deal with uncertainty and are used to planning and doing. What to do

Read more

Kleśas (afflictions)

By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT Kleśas are commonly translated as “afflictions,” but it is better understood as “the cause-of-afflictions.” These are the basic forces which prompt a person to act, think, and feel; they provide the cognitive and motivational framework that dictates how the ordinary person operates in this world. Kleśas are fivefold (Yoga-Sūtra II. 3 – 9): I. Avidyā:

Read more

Samskāras & Vāsanas

By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT Samskāras Samskāras are commonly translated as residual impressions, subliminal activators, mental dispositions or mental formations. They represent the indelible imprints left in the subconscious mind by our daily experiences (perceptions, cognitions, actions and intentions), whether conscious or unconscious, internal or external, desirable or undesirable.  These subliminal activators are highly dynamic forces in our psyche, constantly

Read more

Svadharma

By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT The word svadharma is commonly translated as own norm or own moral duty, but is better understood as the normative behavior arising from one’s own-being (svabhāva). This concept plays a very important role in the teachings of the Bhagavad Gītā. “Better is one’s own dharma, even when not done perfectly than another’s dharma well performed.

Read more

Karma

By Andre Haralyi M.A, C-IAYT Karma literally means “action or deed.” The concept of karma highlights the law of cause and effect, comparable to what modern physics calls the “natural law,”  that seems to permeate all aspects of existence. Every action leads to a reasonable result. Everything that happens originates from something done in the past. “According as one acts,

Read more

The Yogavāsiṣṭha and Heart Health

By Christopher Key Chapple One text often not included in discussions of the healing powers of Yoga is the Yogavāsiṣṭha, a text that, building on its earlier forms including the Mokṣopāya, reached its current form probably in the 12th century in Kashmir. It blends Advaita Vedānta with Vijñānavāda Buddhism and includes a type of therapeutic Yoga that emphasizes the importance

Read more

Gunas

By Andre Haralyi M.A, C-IAYT The gunas are commonly translated as “qualities” or “constituents” referring to the triad of primary qualities (sattva, rajas and tamas) thought to be the principal building blocks of the cosmos or material world (prakrti) according to Yoga and Sāṃkhya traditions. The three gunas have been widely adopted by many Eastern philosophies for categorizing psychological behaviors

Read more

Pañca-Maya-Kośa

 By Andre Haralyi M.A, C-IAYT “There are 5 sheaths (kośas) in which the Self is manifested as the ego (jīvātman)”  Taittirīya Upaniṣad II. 1.1 The Pañca-Maya-Kośa model was first introduced in chapter 2 of the Taittirīya Upaniṣad. Yoga Therapy adopts this model and in its comprehensive approach, which takes into account all levels of the human existence. This model states

Read more

Duḥkha / Sukha

By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT Duḥkha The word duḥkha literally means “bad space,” and is commonly associated with the feeling of suffering, uneasiness, uncomfortableness, unpleasantness, difficulty, pain, sorrow, and trouble. The concept of duḥkha refers to the idea of having a “bad axle hole.” When the axle hole of a wheel is not perfectly round the axle does not fit

Read more

Upaniṣads

By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT The Sanskrit term “Upaniṣad” is derived from upa (near), ni (down) and sad (to sit), i.e. sitting down near. It makes reference to the student sitting down near the teacher while learning secret doctrines. In the Monier-Williams Sanskrit Dictionary the word Upaniṣad received an additional meaning: “setting to rest ignorance by revealing the knowledge of

Read more

Self-realization

By Andre Haralyi, M.A., C-IAYT In the Western world “Self-realization” is understood as the fulfillment of one’s own potential. As Erich Fromm said “Man’s main task in life is to give birth to himself, to become what he potentially is.” This concept has gained great popularity over the years specially among those interested in psycho-analysis, humanistic psychology and Western esotericism which

Read more