• Prāṇāyāma

    By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT Prāṇāyāma, commonly translated as “breath control,” is composed of two Sanskrit words, prāṇa which means “life-force, vital-force, energy or breath” and yāma meaning “restraint.” So,

    Read more »
  • What does Yoga mean in the Bhagavad Gītā? A semantic analysis

    By Alba Rodriguez Juan, M.A.  The word “yoga” is extensively used in the BG in a variety of ways. This Indian narrative consists of 18 chapters, with each chapter named as

    Read more »
  • Citta (mind)

    By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT The word citta is derived from the verbal root √cit, meaning “to perceive, to observe, or to know.” This word, commonly translated as “mind,”  is

    Read more »
  • Human crisis and Covid-19. How can Yoga Philosophy help.

    By Alba Rodriguez Juan, M.A. Current times are challenging for most of us. The widespread of Covid-19 around the globe has put humanity on trial. It has taken us to

    Read more »
  • Kleśas (afflictions)

    By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT Kleśas are commonly translated as “afflictions,” but it is better understood as “the cause-of-afflictions.” These are the basic forces which prompt a person to act,

    Read more »
  • Samskāras & Vāsanas

    By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT Samskāras Samskāras are commonly translated as residual impressions, subliminal activators, mental dispositions or mental formations. They represent the indelible imprints left in the subconscious mind

    Read more »
  • Svadharma

    By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT The word svadharma is commonly translated as own norm or own moral duty, but is better understood as the normative behavior arising from one’s own-being

    Read more »
  • Karma

    By Andre Haralyi M.A, C-IAYT Karma literally means “action or deed.” The concept of karma highlights the law of cause and effect, comparable to what modern physics calls the “natural

    Read more »
  • The Yogavāsiṣṭha and Heart Health

    By Christopher Key Chapple One text often not included in discussions of the healing powers of Yoga is the Yogavāsiṣṭha, a text that, building on its earlier forms including the

    Read more »
  • Gunas

    By Andre Haralyi M.A, C-IAYT The gunas are commonly translated as “qualities” or “constituents” referring to the triad of primary qualities (sattva, rajas and tamas) thought to be the principal

    Read more »

Recent Posts

Traditional Yoga

Prāṇāyāma

By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT Prāṇāyāma, commonly translated as “breath control,” is composed of two Sanskrit words, prāṇa which means “life-force, vital-force, energy or breath”

Samskāras & Vāsanas

By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT Samskāras Samskāras are commonly translated as residual impressions, subliminal activators, mental dispositions or mental formations. They represent the indelible imprints

Svadharma

By Andre Haralyi M.A., C-IAYT The word svadharma is commonly translated as own norm or own moral duty, but is better understood as the normative

Karma

By Andre Haralyi M.A, C-IAYT Karma literally means “action or deed.” The concept of karma highlights the law of cause and effect, comparable to what

Gunas

By Andre Haralyi M.A, C-IAYT The gunas are commonly translated as “qualities” or “constituents” referring to the triad of primary qualities (sattva, rajas and tamas)

Yoga Therapy

Gunas

By Andre Haralyi M.A, C-IAYT The gunas are commonly translated as “qualities” or “constituents” referring to the triad of primary qualities (sattva, rajas and tamas)

Pañca-Maya-Kośa

 By Andre Haralyi M.A, C-IAYT “There are 5 sheaths (kośas) in which the Self is manifested as the ego (jīvātman)”  Taittirīya Upaniṣad II. 1.1 The

What is Yoga Therapy

By Andre Haralyi, M.A., C-IAYT Yoga therapy is a holistic discipline that aims to help in the prevention, treatment, and palliative care of those suffering